December 18, 2017

Atrial Fibrillation and Clueless Doctors

I’m mad and must post this before I explode. Today alone I’ve answered a dozen e-mails or comments from folks suffering with atrial fibrillation around the same theme—their clueless doctors!

Now don’t get me wrong, there are so many good doctors out there. And the doctors to those folks who e-mailed me are probably very good, too. The problem is that most of our doctors don’t truly understand what afib does to us. And part of it may be that we don’t communicate it so that they will understand. So it’s time for us to stand up and tell them exactly what afib does to us.

Afib takes a huge toll, not just physical, but emotional and financial as well. Not just on us, but on our families, too. Here are just a few of those things.

  • Huge medical bills from all those trips to the emergency room, tests, and procedures.
  • No medical insurance–once you have afib, you can’t get medical insurance. If you can get it, you can’t afford it because it’s too expensive. (Try $1,600-$2,500 per month and more just for a family of 3.)
  • Losing time from work, which means lost income.
  • Losing your job, or even having to change careers.
  • Losing cars, houses, life-savings, retirement savings, everything!

In my case, my family had to travel with me as they couldn’t let me out of their sight for fear I’d have blood clots and a stroke while off by myself (due to blood clots and a near-stroke with my very first afib episode). Now that’s expensive!

But we don’t talk about the financial impact—it’s just too embarrassing. We have to change that. If doctors don’t know this, they will just diddle around, experimenting, figuring that they will eventually find a treatment that works while we deal with meds with nasty side effects that make us feel like crap, meds that quickly stop working, or being on Coumadin and looking like we’re battered. We’re the ones suffering, and our doctors just don’t realize what it’s doing to us. Give us an afib cure already!

And while they’re fiddling, Rome is burning. Afib begets afib–the longer you have it, the worse it gets, and the harder it becomes to solve. I hear from so many people that just can’t get it solved because they have had it for so long.

As a patient, I tell my doctors that I want to know all of my options so I can make the decision. And I want to research all the pros and cons and talk with others before I do. As my doctor, you should expect no less from me than to be an informed patient. Help me to be so.

I see many folks just going around their doctors and self-referring to surgeons and EPs (electrophysiologists are cardiologists that specialize in heart rhythms) looking for an atrial fibrillation cure. They shouldn’t have to. Our doctors need to work with us as a team to help us solve this problem. We have to help them truly understand how afib affects us and what it is doing to our families as well.

Life is too short to live it in afib.

So, what about you? What have you experienced? Does your doctor really understand and help you solve this problem?

Comments

  1. Annie tirey says:

    Too many of these cardiologist are too arrogant. They just toss out prescription cocktails without informing us about what they’re prescribing, why they’re prescribing it or asking if we are willing to go thru the severe potential side effects. Too many of them don’t keep current on new and better treatments and medications.Every doctor ,especially one that is expected to be a specialist should be retested for their medical license every 10 yrs to ensure that they maintain current on medical advancements and changes.
    And I feel that those doctors that prescribe the last resort medications, like Amiodarone, as the 1st med they perscribe or the dangerous drug digoxin, without closely monitoring the levels are either hoping to increase the level of care their patients need (specially those with good insurance) cause it’s all about the almighty $. Or they simply are too outdated to remain doctors.

    • Brenna Lara says:

      Hi Annie,

      Thank you for sharing your afib story and your symptoms. You may be interested in joining our patient discussion forum (http://forum.stopafib.org/index.php) to connect with other patients who collectively have a great amount of knowledge and experience. You may want to post your story and questions there, and you may also learn a lot from others who have already shared their experience.

      You’ll need to join to see and participate in the discussion. To do so, go to forum.stopafib.org, and click on the big red button that says, “Sign Up”. Once you sign up by registering your email address, your preferred username, and a password, you’ll receive an email to confirm your interest in joining the forum. Click on the confirmation link in that email, and you are ready to go. You’ll be able to log into the forum, read the discussions, and participate.

      I hope that you are able to find others to connect with there that can give you advice, suggestions, and hope. There are many resources on living with afib that you might find helpful. Best of luck to you! We wish you sinus rhythm.

  2. I hate my AFIB. Dr says I will have it till I die, or maybe AFIB will kill me. I have gotten to the point of just saying “OK, DOC”.

    • Brenna Lara says:

      Hi Kay Ann,

      Thank you for sharing your story and your thoughts and concerns on your afib and your doctor. You may be interested in joining our patient discussion forum (http://forum.stopafib.org/index.php?) to connect with other patients who collectively have a great amount of knowledge and experience. You may want to post your story there, and you may also learn a lot from others who have already shared their experience. I hope that you are able to find others to connect with there that can give you advice, suggestions and hope. There are many resources on living with afib that you might find helpful. Best of luck to you!

  3. Catherine says:

    Hey: I’m a 53 year old Canadian who has lived an exemplary and clean lifestyle. I have been a mountain climber for years and a granola bar my whole life. The atrial fib I experience is genetic with 4 out of 8 of us having symptoms and the others are still pretty young.

    The medical model doctors here are just as clueless.

    I have had a lifetime of Atrial Fib, but as time progressed and my stress levels grew so did my episodes until they just did not stop, 8 years ago they performed an AV vein ablation, since then I have had 5 more scheduled ablations and they have gone through with 4, with 2 of them being badly botched. I now have a pacemaker, and a lot of scar tissue.

    I have been on at least 9 beta and calcium channel blockers which resulted in more than a half dozen trips to the emergency room and I have had a multitude of doctors prescribe all kinds of deadly medications, many which I discovered before taking KILL a large percentage of A symptomatic patients, and I am A symptomatic. I have very low blood pressure and have remained in pretty good physical condition because I make a point of walking everyday, even if it is really slowly.

    Since being diagnosed, life has been tough. Being a single mom with no back up emotionally, financially or physically has been very difficult, Transport Canada has taken away my motorcycle license and my commercial drivers license, which I have to qualify and pay big bucks to get back. I am back on my feet because I never say die and my internet business is doing extremely well.

    BUT the best news I could share with you is this—-

    Now I am under the care of a Naturopath and I wish I did that years ago. OMG I feel better than I have in years. She has got me on Hawthorn root for he irregular heart beat, so my episodes have dramatically declined, Mistletoe for the scar tissue, and a number of other anti-arithmics’ natural remedies, I am no longer on Digoxin which was the only thing I could take to slow my heart rate, but I do understand that I need to be on the Warfarin until I no longer have any arrhythmias. Omega threes are great for prevention, organic, wild salmon oil is apparently the best.

    I also take, blue green algae and wheat grass for support.

    What I have learned: Sulphites and MSG are a real no no. Alcohol, especially red wine is a trigger as is caffeine. I do have a cup of coffee every once in a while but it is decaffeinated and organic and not every day. Anything to do with preservatives is not good. Keeping Hydrated is of optimum importance. This is funny because all the physicians I have seen wanted to put my on water pills.

    Taurine, Magnesium, Calcium and Potassium are an absolute must, as well as making sure your iron levels are good for women. To get more guidelines check out the German websites, they have had huge success with controlling Atrial Fib.

    My advise it to find out what you are sensitive to, even if that just means eliminating everything on your eating list, get back to basics, just juice carrots for a couple of days then slowly add foods to your list. And stay away from all processed food. You will be absolutely amazed at what they put sulphites in. I made soup the other day and there were sulphites in the bullion cubes. Guess how I found out about that.

    And see a natural doctor if you can, they treat your whole body and spirit at the same time. My anxiety levels have dropped dramatically and I sleep really well. Our next adventure is to treat the menopause as hormones also affect your heart.

  4. May God Bless each and everyone that has A-Fib.Ihave had it for years,I am 75.I first noticedit after I took Darvon for pain fron the shingles.I took toprol for A-fib which in turn gave me hypothroidism.Now I am on Synthroid.So now on I check the side effects of any medicines.I just went to a Dr,yesterday and he wants to put a loop over my left breast tocheck my A-fib and I am suppose to wear it for a year or two.I don’t know what good that will do because a Dr.has already determined I have A-Fib years ago when I wore a heart monitor for a month.Today I am anervous wreck because I think the DrS.are just guessing
    how to treat us,I don’t think any of them know what to.do.May God help us all.Judy

  5. I discovered that my episodes of A-Fib were caused by dehydration. A doctor prescribed “water pills” when I was first diagnosed 3 years ago. He was wrong, very wrong. I am going with plant-based diet, exercise, proper hydration at all times, and small dose of aspirin. No more doctors for me.

    • Addendum: I know we are a society that worships doctors and medication. But I believe my condition was caused by lifestyle; alcohol, coffee, bad sleep, and worry. I now consume no alcohol, eat vegan, exercise, and I haven’t been to a doctor in years, don’t need them.

  6. OMG i feel your pain in went into AFIB 10 years ago but it converted after 4 hours well 10 years later it happened again just last week took 4 days to convert back i am a nervous wreck every day cant sleep thinking i am going to die in my sleep this is terrible! and like you i was told i had mitral valve prolapse so i was taking antibiotics for teeth cleanings for years was just told i dont have it at all!! I take xanax because i worry everyday i dont want to live this way it has taken over my life!!! they have got to come up with something to cure AFib. my brother who was only 46 has it and had the ablation but he is one of those people that never worries about things. yeah right! it has got to make him just as scared as i am!!

  7. My husband was diagnosed about 2 years ago and the episodes are getting worse. As if him having this at 33 isn’t bad enough, we have no insurance, no savings left, and his job is threatening to terminate him unless he turns in FMLA paperwork. His cardiologist’s office won’t fill out the paperwork unless he comes in for a $120 out of pocket appointment that we just can’t afford because he has been out of work since his last episode. I feel like no one cares, no one wants to help him get better because we don’t have insurance…

    I wish I knew what to do…

  8. I can’t afford a dr. and was in the hospital last week for afib. I have had irregular heartrate for years but the last time they diagnosed it was the 80’s. I was told it was mitral valve, now I’m told its not. I’m terrified and on ativan cause i’ve been in a panic attack since i left the hospital mainly because I don’t have any way to get treatment. I don’t want to live with this hanging over my head like this. I feel awful.

  9. JamesK_Va says:

    I am glad I found this blog, now maybe I can learn more about my afib and what to expect or not expect.
     
    I had no clue I had afib, none whatsoever, it reared it’s ugly head when I was 1200 miles from home working although I did not know at the time what it was, I just knew something wasn’t right as the only thing that was affected was my breathing and overall strength.It was 6 days later when I got home I decided to go to the emergency room, my wait was only about 15 minutes and when they took me in the back (just a short walk) my heart rate had climbed to 160. I spent 4 hours in the ER before being moved to ICU where is stayed for 2 and a half days before being moved to a regular room.During my stay at the hospital I was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism which may very well be the reason for my afib, although they will not do a cath until that is taken care of. They are worried that the iodine used in the cath will set things off and I could possibly end up in cardiac arrest. It wasn’t until my 5th day in the hospital that they were able to bring my heart rate down below 100.I can honestly say I am now getting used to the lovenox shots, which I administer at home for now, I am taking coumadin, methimazole, lisinopril, carvedilol, digoxin, and my least favorite lasix.I went in the hospital on may 11 2012 and came out on the 18th, it took me almost 6 days to finally get the doctor to slow down and really explain to me what was going on. I guess my getting frustrated and expressing the frustrations to my nurses finally made him realize I was not a mushroom, he then sat down ad we had a talk but some questions still went unanswered.
     
    My hearts ejection fraction is currently 30% but the cardiologist said he thinks this will get better once things get under control.
     
    So I mentioned before that I was 1200 miles from home when the episode hit, I am a truck driver, not for the time being though as the cardiologist said no driving for me, not even my personal vehicle. Being a truck driver I was already at risk for other health issues (blood clots in the legs) but never really thought something like this would happen and I would be sitting at home saying what am I going to do now.I  know the thyroid issue must be taken care of in order for them to do a cath to check for small clots not seen or found on the ct scan or echo but other than driving how do you think afib and thyroidism might be keeping me out of work? I have missed no work in over 10 years and I am already about go to stir crazy from being home and it’s only been 4 days not counting my hospital stay.
     
    Just one more note about work, the cardiologist doesn’t seem to have an answer when I ask him about returning to work even if it means a change of jobs…which I really hate to do but, would if I really need to.
     
    Your thoughts?
     
    James K.

    • James,
       
      I’m so sorry about what you’ve been through. 
       
      I would think that they could get your afib sufficiently under control so that you can go back to work. Whether it’s safe for you (and others) for you to drive a truck is not something that I can address as I am not a clinician. But I would think you should be able to go back to some kind of work.
       
      Hyperthyroidism definitely causes afib, and if they can treat that, I wonder if the afib might subside somewhat. And your having such a low ejection fraction (30) makes me wonder if you might have had afib for a while. Are you in afib all the time, or does it come and go? If you’re in it all the time, if they can get you converted out of it, then I wonder if your ejection fraction might rise.
       
      I wish you the best, and that the afib subsides as soon as they get your thyroid issues under control.
       
      Mellanie

      • JamesK_Va says:

         @mellanie  Hi Melanie,
         
        Thanks for the reply to my post,
        As for being in afib all the time it seems I am in afib more often than not but to try and figure the actual amount of time I am in afib I couldn’t even guess.At my doctors appointment on the 21st he acknowledged I was still i afib done another ekg and of course more blood work. They are trying to get my blood INR to 2.0 for the coumadin (no lovenox shots lately) and after that days blood work I was told my INR was too high and to not take the coumadin for a couple of days.That didn’t do much good, had blood work done again yesterday the 25th and the results were my INR was too low and was told to start taking the coumadin again, so far no more mention of the lovenox shots, lol.So on the 29th is a visit to the cardiologist and I am hoping the news will be good, yes, I am hopeful, lol. I also have to have more blood work done on the 29th and I am hoping my INR will be what it should be or pretty near 2.0I have noticed here lately (and I blame the medicine) that with normal activity I seem to tire fairly quickly, the other day I decided to clean my 450 gallon koi pond, scrape algae off the sides and vacuum the bottom as well as drain some of the water and refill it but, by the time I was done it was as if I had just finished running a marathon. I was tired, I was weak and I felt awful. My family even said I didn’t look too good and were upset because they thought I had overdone it on physical activity. I am having a hard time just trying to take it easy, like I said in my earlier post I am not used to not working and just need to be doing something all the time but, anything is better than another 6 days in the hospital.As for the thyroidism, they don’t seem to be too concerned with that at this time, it seems my blood INR level is more important but I will have a talk with the cardiologist on Tuesday about it even though I know what he is going to say before I talk to him.That’s not his field and I need to see an endocrinologist, which I know but what I am trying to find out is when is the time to see one, at what point in the treatment do the doctors say now is the time to concentrate on the thyroid.
         
        Anyway I will stop rambling now, thanks again for the reply, have a great weekend and here’s hoping for good new on Tuesday.James K 
         
         

        • James, 
           
          Afib makes you tire easily, as do a couple of your medications, so it’s hard to say how much impact each of those things has. You may want to scale back for a while.
           
          I would think that you should be seeing a doctor for the thyroid sooner rather than later.
           
          Their focus on the INR is to help you avoid a stroke. But I’d want to know what they are going to do to stop the afib, sooner rather than later. 
           
          Good luck with the cardiologist. You might ask if you should be seeing an electrophysiologist, which is a cardiologist that specializes in heart rhythms.
           
          Good luck to you.
           
          Mellanie

  10. JamesK_Va says:

    I am glad I found this blog, now maybe I can learn more about my afib and what to expect or not expect.
     
    I had no clue I had afib, none whatsoever, it reared it’s ugly head when I was 1200 miles from home working although I did not know at the time what it was, I just knew something wasn’t right as the only thing that was affected was my breathing and overall strength.It was 6 days later when I got home I decided to go to the emergency room, my wait was only about 15 minutes and when they took me in the back (just a short walk) my heart rate had climbed to 160. I spent 4 hours in the ER before being moved to ICU where is stayed for 2 and a half days before being moved to a regular room.During my stay at the hospital I was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism which may very well be the reason for my afib, although they will not do a cath until that is taken care of. They are worried that the iodine used in the cath will set things off and I could possibly end up in cardiac arrest. It wasn’t until my 5th day in the hospital that they were able to bring my heart rate down below 100.I can honestly say I am now getting used to the lovenox shots, which I administer at home for now, I am taking coumadin, methimazole, lisinopril, carvedilol, digoxin, and my least favorite lasix.I went in the hospital on may 11 2012 and came out on the 18th, it took me almost 6 days to finally get the doctor to slow down and really explain to me what was going on. I guess my getting frustrated and expressing the frustrations to my nurses finally made him realize I was not a mushroom, he then sat down ad we had a talk but some questions still went unanswered.
     
    So I mentioned before that I was 1200 miles from home when the episode hit, I am a truck driver, not for the time being though as the cardiologist said no driving for me, not even my personal vehicle. Being a truck driver I was already at risk for other health issues (blood clots in the legs) but never really thought something like this would happen and I would be sitting at home saying what am I going to do now.I  know the thyroid issue must be taken care of in order for them to do a cath to check for small clots not seen or found on the ct scan or echo but other than driving how do you think afib and thyroidism might be keeping me out of work? I have missed no work in over 10 years and I am already about go to stir crazy from being home and it’s only been 4 days not counting my hospital stay.
     
    Just one more note about work, the cardiologist doesn’t seem to have an answer when I ask him about returning to work even if it means a change of jobs…which I really hate to do but, would if I really need to.
     
    Your thoughts?
     
    James K.

  11. austin coe says:

    Dear Mellanie: You are doing a terrific job and maybe this is what Godcalled you do, a real lifesaver. I wrote a long time ago. I had heart murmur as teen and probably is congenital. At age l7 I found heart murmur, told to slow down.At age 60 had titanium aortic valve put in and mitral tied up better. Now at 83 I am considered congestive heart failure. Enlarged atrium which they said would make an ablation worthless. Gave me a pacemaker with defib. and stent in one of heart arteries. Took me off amiodarone and left me on coumodin which I weekly test at home. Some talk aboutfuture stem cells in the future if I am hear. I have no rapid heart beats and low blood pressure. Take several heart medicines, see cardiol. monthly. Had low platelet problem which now seems to have improved with prednisone. But my heart dr. gives me the attitude, we have done all we can. Just exercise, diet, take pills, and “wait it out”. I keep searching for more answers and read about the research going on. But I keep asking, am I missing something? I am up every day, walk fine on level, and have mild apnea (Oxy. at nite).
    I know my age is against me. As my ef falls maybe I can get an extra pump if I could survive surgery. I read about all the studies in the world as AFib is increasing in all the world. But USA is last to allow anythhing new.

    Thank God you are so good in what you find. Can you suggest any other avenues for me.with mky long time afib.??? I read about the OHIO Univ. hosp with the dr. who does 5 box. Which sources seem to be on the cutting edge that I an tune in to. I keep a positive hope that I might make it to 90 years .

    You need not publish this long comment or use it as you will. I know your work is helping so many and I pray God will give you strength to live long.. I can understand now drs. are do busy with l5 min. appointments that I dont know that they just want to go with the status quo. I get several heart hosps. publications but you seem to be on the cutting edge.. …—austin coe

    • Austin,

      Thanks for the kind words, especially comparing our information with that from heart hospitals.

      Stem cells are a bit down the road, and unlikely to help us for a while.

      Enlarged atria are more of a problem for ablations than for surgery. And a pacemaker generally isn’t an issue for surgery either. Surgery has been known to reverse congestive heart failure, increasing ejection fractions to near or above normal, so a pump would be unneeded. The only issue I see is that some surgeons won’t do surgery over 80, but some will, on a case by case basis, depending on the health of the patient. It’s worth checking into.

      My sense is that the 5-box surgery is not the right choice since you had valve surgery earlier. You’d probably need the open-heart version of afib surgery because you probably have scar tissue from the earlier surgery. So you’d want to find a surgeon who specializes in open-heart afib surgery (maze III or maze IV) and have a discussion about your overall health to see if it is possible.

      Good luck.

      Mellanie

  12. Chuck Miller says:

    Contrary to Melanie’s opinion to Amy, above (which frankly surprises me, since she was cured by the same procedure that cured me 7-years ago) there IS a “best treatment” for lone Afib (the kind that affacts 85% of Afib sufferers)! It is called the Wolf Mini-maze, which not only eliminates Afib for an average of 90% of sufferers in one minimally-invasive surgical procedure, but it removes the source of heart induced stroke potential (the left atrial appendage) thus eliminating the need for Coumadin regardless of whether you have any further Afib episodes, and also eliminates need for anti-arrhytmic and heart rate prescriptions! I had Afib for 13 years and encountered three ER-required Congestive Heart Failure and ultimately resulted in an ejection fraction of as low as 15% before the mini-maze and can and do testify about the life-changing results that have kept me Afib free for 7 years. I successfully survived 9 clueless cardiologists/electro-physiologists that erroneously stated that Afib WAS NOT life-threatening, or were in denial that I had anything to be concerned about.
     My impression of cardiologists is that most are more concerned about having life-long patients (profit sources) rather than curing the ailment once and for all.
    A simple test for their competence is to ask them for a referral or ask them about  what they think about the mini-maze cure. If they start bad mouthing it, then tell them like I did, that you are going elsewhere to get honest answers, because you don’t need their referral anyway!
    –Chuck

    • Chuck,

      While mini maze was the right choice for you, and it was the right choice for me, it may not be the right choice for Amy. It is not the right choice for everyone, which is especially true for those with persistent and longstanding persistent afib.

      I am not a medical professional, so I cannot evaluate Amy’s medical history and whether mini maze is the best treatment for her. Lone afib is only about 15% of afibbers (NOT 85%–that 85% is those with underlying heart disease).

      Lone afib is more common in men than women. Women are at much greater risk of stroke, often due to underlying heart disease that is not easily diagnosed in women (stress tests find 2/3 of heart disease in men, but only 1/3 of heart disease in women). So it’s not appropriate for us to tell her what is the best FOR HER since we do not know her co-morbidities. I cannot agree that mini maze is definitely the “best treatment for her”. We do not know that, and my personal experience is that mini maze success rates seem to be higher in men than women. Most of the failures I’ve seen have been in women.

      Also, today many mini maze surgeons will not do the procedure on those with paroxysmal afib unless they are referred by an EP for the procedure as they believe that trying an ablation first is the correct approach. Thus, they only do those with persistent afib or with enlarged left atria or other conditions that make catheter ablation less appealing.

      I understand your zeal for the procedure that cured you, and I have a lot of zeal for it, too. But I also know that it is not the right answer for everyone. I am not a medical professional, and thus while I can provide facts, I cannot offer medical advice.

      Mellanie

  13. ABLATION IS NOT FOR EVERYONE. THERE IS A CUT OFF AGE OF 70 AND YOU MUST HAVE A PRISTINE HEART, NO STINTS ETC . HOW DISAPPOINYED I WAS.

    • Margaret,

      That’s unusual as many doctors will do catheter ablation up to age 75 or 80. And I know folks with stents who have had ablations. Maybe it was where your stents are located.

      Have you considered surgery (surgical ablation) instead? Generally age 80 is the cut-off, though some surgeons evaluate on a case-by-case basis and have done surgery on those a few years past 80 if they were very healthy. And stents are not generally an issue either. Even pacemakers aren’t an issue.

      Mellanie

  14. Amy before you find out the best treatment the doctors need to find the cause of your afib.

  15. I know what you mean. Had palpitations for years then started getting these attacks 5 years ago off and on different than the normal benign palpitations. Went through 4 cardiologists all gave me 24 hour monitor I asked for the 30 day one but they all thought i did not need it . always told nothing wrong its just stress lay off the caffeine problem was i was never stressed. all insisted it was only mild benign palps and i am healthy no one took me serious because they could not catch the episodes every time i wore the stupid 24 hour monitor i was not having one. went to hospital a few times they would keep me till it passed and refer me to another cardiologist. to make matters worse when the cardiologist tried to get my hospital records he could never get his hands on them. So again they had nothing to go on finally the cardiologist i have had for a year was out of office when I had my next attack they told me to come in and get checked by the time I got there it passed and I was only having the benign palps again but the nurse practitioner decided to order me the 2 week monitor 1 week later while wearing it at 3 in the morning I had an attack lasted 45 minits I hit the record button and 3 days later I get a phone call from my cardiologist wanting to see me right away turns out they saw abnormal heart rhythm atrial fibulation finally 5 years later they found the arrhythmia I am mad I had to fight for the 30 day monitor afib is nothing to play around with and needs early treatment to avoid it becoming permanent and causing stroke I am only 48 years old Know they want me to have a stress test and echo I am on a beta blocker and baby asprine. People you have to be your own health advocate stay on top of the doctors dont let them tell you it is in your head. My doctor is suddenly bending over backwards since The monitor caught it .This is something I get 2 times a month sometimes a few months go by and I am find then other times It can happen 2 a week longest episode I had lasted 8 hours that was when I went to hospital over a year ago.only finally diagnosed 3 days ago I will let you know how everything goes. Does anyone know the best treatment for afib?

    • Amy,

      I’m sorry you’ve had such challenges.

      Unfortunately, there is no “best treatment for afib”. We’re all different, and respond differently to medications and procedures. The best thing to do is to find a specialist, an electrophysiologist (that’s a cardiologist that specializes in heart rhythms), and start working on possible treatments. Some people prefer medications, which is the normal first step, but if that doesn’t work, procedures are an option as well. Some people prefer to move quickly to procedures if medications fail.

      Good luck.

      Mellanie

    • I know what you mean, I am sitting here having palpitations pretty strong for the last 3 days. I had a 24 hour monitor last week, I had no palpitations worth worrying about a few days before I was pretty bad had them so bad my nurse that was doing my infusion had a Dr. check me out and I flunked the ekg he did.i was so dizzy and had brain fog so bad and confusion, glad I had a ride in. felt really good , best in a long time for about 5 days now I am on the sofa worried about how bad I feel, I don’t feel like talking to my Dr. cause I feel like it is a waste of time, they will make me go in the hospital and say you are fine.I am 72 never had any cardio related surgery.my np said I can’t have the ablation, and I was so confused while I was there , I don’t know what she gave as a reason.

  16. Christine,

    I’m so sorry. Good luck.

    Mellanie

  17. hello back in AF again so back down for cardioversion again, god its evil..attacks you when you least expect it xChristine

  18. hello back in AF again so back down for cardioversion again, god its evil..attacks you when you least expect it xChristine

  19. Not sure if this info will help anyone, but just as a possible what if cause….

    In the past 3 months I got in the habit of wearing my Google Android in my left breast shirt pocket.
    Within one to two weeks of starting this practice, I started with A-Fib episodes (never had before).
    In approx. 45 days I experienced 6 (six) episodes.
    I started wearing my phone away from the heart, I wear it on the opposite hip side ( on my belt ).
    Thank God Its been 3 weeks with no episodes.

    I asked my cardiologist if it could be possible, and he said yes it possibly could. The heart reacts to electrical impulses.

    Keep these new powerful cell phones away from the heart !!

    I will keep you posted with any further progress….

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