August 18, 2017

Improved Quality of Life From Cryoballoon Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation in the STOP AF Study — Findings Reported at Heart Rhythm 2010 and Cardiostim 2010

At Heart Rhythm 2010, there was an update on the results of the STOP AF (Sustained Treatment of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation) clinical trial that involved patients who received cryoablation using the Arctic Front® Cardiac CryoAblation Catheter System. At twelve months following these procedures, these younger, highly-symptomatic patients had better quality of life and dramatically decreased afib symptoms.

In the article linked below, Jeremy Ruskin, MD, chair of the STOP AF trial steering committee and Director of the Cardiac Arrhythmia Service at Massachusetts General Hospital, discusses those results along with some of the technical advantages of the cryoballoon catheter. We also report on data just released at Cardiostim 2010 regarding shorter procedure times with this catheter.

Read more:  STOP AF Cryoablation for Atrial Fibrillation — Quality of Life Results and Technical Considerations

Comments

  1. Why isn’t radiation dose ever discussed when talking about ablation of the heart? Radiation doses are very high and should be a concern that is taken into consideration. Some patients will ultimately get cancer from their radiation exposure related to ablation. Why i medicine so sloppy? Where are the numbers about how many are really helped by ablation? The information available is all about how wonderful this treatment is. But, I wonder? Where are the statistics regarding cure or partial cures? Where are the descriptions of partial cures?

  2. Why isn’t radiation dose ever discussed when talking about ablation of the heart? Radiation doses are very high and should be a concern that is taken into consideration. Some patients will ultimately get caner from their radiaiton exposure related to ablation. Why i mediine so sloppy? here are the numbers of who is really helped by ablation? The information available is all about how wonderful this treatment is. But, I wonder? Where are the statistics regarding cure or partial cures? Where are the descriptions of partial cures?

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