October 22, 2017

Study Shows Women with Atrial Fibrillation (AF) Have Catheter Ablations Later Than Men, And Have Worse Results

New research from Dr. Andrea Natale and colleagues on gender disparities in atrial fibrillation points out that women with afib are less likely to have catheter ablation treatment than men. When they do have atrial fibrillation catheter ablations, they tend to be older and sicker, meaning that they are more likely to have persistent or long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation instead of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. In addition, they tend to have had more failed antiarrhythmic drugs and end up having more complications from catheter ablation than men.

Read more:  Women with Atrial Fibrillation Less Likely To Get Catheter Ablation Than Men — And Have More Complications

Comments

  1. Nancy,

    I am 42 years old and had an EP study and ablation done after suffering for the past year (diagnosis was 22 years ago).

    Mine was also done by Dr. James Baker and within 24 hours my blood pressure is down from hypertension to normal and I am hopeful for getting my health back. I think it is important that we all choose the surgeon and hospital with great care. St. Thomas Heart Group has a stellar team and they listened to me; took me seriously. Often women are not listened to and this their treatment gets delayed because they get tired of being dismissed as having anxiety, being hormonal, etc.

    Dr. Baker and his team were amazing and if my first two days are any indication of my years to come then I am indebted to the doctor.

  2. I have been diagnosed with A-Fib about six weeks ago and I am now on a beta blocker. I wonder if there isn’t anything else that can be done. Am I on this beta blocker now for how long? Isn’t there something that can be done to stop it? It doesn’t go into A-Fib a lot. But every day at least a couple of times. What am I suppose to wait for?

  3. Nancy,

    Excellent. Congratulations on your success with the ablation. You are the ideal candidate – someone who has had paroxysmal afib for less than 2-3 years. I was the same way, and am afib-free, and hope to remain so.

    You were fortunate that your afib was treated so promptly, either through your efforts, or those of your doctor. Thanks for sharing your success story with us.

    Mellanie

  4. Nancy Sessums says:

    I just read the article about women not having much success with catheter ablation. I wanted to tell you that I am a 65 year old woman that developed paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, over a year ago. I had the catheter ablation in Nashville, Tn. at St. Thomas Heart, by Dr. James Baker. I have been free of afib for almost a year. I did not have any success with antirhythemic drugs.

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